This is a blog post by Barry Eliason, which has been posted at the Private Eye moisture testing web site.

I received a call a few weeks ago that was typical of calls I get several times a year. It was the real estate agent for a client of mine that had recently hired me to do a moisture test on a stucco home they were buying. The moisture testing had found several areas of high moisture and even some soft or missing sheathing, indicating some structural damage. The sellers of the home questioned the accuracy of my report and hired another company to re-test the house. This other company did their testing from the interior rather than from the exterior as I had done. Their report to the home owners? “Every place we tested was dry”.

The agent on the phone was politely asking me if I thought I had gotten it wrong. First I summed up the situation. “Well, you now have two different opinions and we need to know which one of them is correct.” He agreed and wondered how to resolve the situation. My answer was to do what I had recommended in my initial report: remove some small pieces of stucco in the areas that tested high and see what's going on.

Click here to continue reading: How Accurate is Exterior Moisture Testing?

About Reuben Saltzman

Reuben is a second-generation home inspector with a passion for his work. He grew up remodeling homes and learning about carpentry since he was old enough to hold a hammer. Reuben grew up thinking he was going to be a school teacher because he enjoyed teaching others so much. In a sense, that’s a lot of what home inspections are about, so Reuben truly does what he loves. Sharlene has worked with Structure Tech since 2000 and Reuben has been contributing to her blog since 2008.

Related Posts

Minnesota Radon Licensing Act update, plus my two cents

I first shared news of the Minnesota Radon Licensing Act over a year ago, but a fair amount has changed since then.

Read More

Top 10 Home Inspection Defects For Old Houses

10.  Tree Branches Rubbing On The Roof  Tree branches do a lot of damage to roofs.  Just think about branches rubbing on the roof all day long while the wind is blowing.  This adds up to a lot of damage.  Tree branches too close to the roof will also give squirrels, raccoons, and other pests.

Read More

Gas Fireplace Glass, White Haze

After years of use, gas fireplaces often develop a cloudy white haze on the glass. This white haze makes the flames difficult to see, ruins any potential illusion that you’re looking at a real fireplace, and really kills the mood.

Read More